Can I Protect My Pension From My Soon-to-be Ex?

MA adopts the position that ALL assets of the parties (individual and marital) are put on the table for distribution at time of divorce. Many states honor “separate property” doctrine at time of divorce–that is property the parties’ owned before marriage or in their name only — but MA does not.  So, any pension in place during the time of marriage is subject to division. Its very hard to get away from the strict letter of the law when it comes to pensions; however, you and your spouse are free to negotiate and make any arrangement you want, that is acceptable to the Court, if you settle your divorce by agreement.  You can negotiate the distribution of assets (including pension funds), custody, child support, alimony–ALL OF IT. You can have a lawyer draft an divorce agreement which addresses all the issues that must be addressed, present it to the Court and once approved, the Agreement will be incorporated into the final judgment of divorce and those will be the orders you will live by thereafter.

Your spouse my waive the right to her share of the pension funds in exchange for something or for nothing in return. It’s the spouse’s right to waive. If she is truly willing to make the transition as painless as possible she might consider waiving her interest in the pension, or exchanging it for some benefit she wants, such as paying for college for the kids or keeping the marital home–this, of course, should be based on the value of the pension assets she is waiving. Typically, the spouse is entitled to half of the pension funds.

itsyourfault
Health insurance: You can voluntarily agree to continue the children’s health insurance after the divorce. In fact, if the spouse doesn’t have a comparable policy or if the children are dependent on your coverage for their insurance you may be ordered by the court to continue their coverage as part of the child support order.
Another thing you might want to consider is a separation agreement, if you and your spouse are not ready for a divorce but want to live apart. MA doesn’t recognize legal separation but does have provisions for separate support. This addresses living apart, the support for the children and possibly support for the spouse; it will NOT address distribution of marital assets or the divorce itself.  Separate Support judgments  in MA do not convert into divorce (as in some other states); if you decide you want a divorce, you would have to start an action distinct from the separation papers.

Hope this was helpful 🙂

Estela Matta, Esquire

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Can My Husband & I Just Agree How We’ll Divide Our Property?

Verbal agreements between the parties are totally unenforceable in law. You must memorialize an agreement in writing and file it with the appropriate court. Any Settlement Agreement between the parties is subject to approval of the court.  In addition to certain statutory requirements, the Agreement must be “fair”, not entered into under duress and each party should have advice of independent counsel.  Retaining a counselor to draft, file and argue the matter in a court is the best course of action.  This is really not a time for self help.

MA does not recognize legal separations, but does have other provisions to protect the separated spouses. If you are contemplating a separation, consider a separate support petition.  This is will allow a couple to establish a support order for spouse and custodial parent, if you have children.  It will NOT  address distribution of property and does NOT dissolve the marriage.

Couple-disagreeing

http://online-divorce-lawyer.com.au/tag/divorce-property-settlement/

http://www.avvo.com/attorneys/02110-ma-estela-matta-4257429.html

How is an inheritance treated in a divorce?

Generally, inheritances are not subject to equitable distribution because, by law, inheritances are not considered marital property. Instead, inheritances are treated as separate property belonging to the person who received the inheritance, and therefore may not be divided between the parties in a divorce.

However, state laws determine how an inheritance is treated in a divorce based upon how it was treated by the heir upon receipt of the asset(s).  If it’s “shared”, the rules vary greatly among the states. For instance, if the inheritance is deposited into a joint bank account and used for joint marital expenses (called “comingling of the inheritance”), the inheritance loses its immunity. Likewise, if the inheritance is used to make improvements to the primary residence, it may also lose its immunity.

Therefore, comingling is key — if this “separate property” is used in a way that benefits joint marital assets, the inheritance is no longer considered separate property, and may be subject to equal division upon divorce.

If this inheritance has never been commingled with marital assets, a divorcing spouse will have no right for inclusion in the distribution.

If the inheritance was acquired before the marriage, it is advisable to have a pre-nuptial agreement that specifies the property is not a joint or marital asset.  However, the same rules of comingling will still apply if the assets are joined with other marital funds or used as marital property.

This issue is fact-specific and subject to state law, so it is advisable to contact a  local divorce attorney to review your facts and circumstances to best advise you of your legal options.